Winemakers

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Milan Vujnic

Milan Vujnic was captivated by the art of winemaking from a young age, growing up on his family’s vineyard in Croatia, making artisan wine from indigenous grapes. As Head Winemaker at Truro Vineyards, Milan brings to the East Coast decades of global experience working with some of the most distinguished wine institutions around the world, with the goal of helping to propel the up-and-coming New England wine region.

After earning his B.S. in Enology and Viticulture at the University of Pristina in Yugoslavia, Milan immersed himself in the world of winemaking as a Laboratory Assistant at Villa Maria Estate in Marlborough, New Zealand before relocating to Stags’ Leap Winery in the heart of wine country, Napa Valley. It was in Napa that Milan fell in love with the alchemy of winemaking, eagerly learning everything there is to know about production, aging and cultivation of countless grape varieties.

Prior to joining Truro Vineyards + South Hollow Spirits, Milan served as Head Winemaker at the Karlo Estates in Wellington, Ontario. As a passion project, he has also spent time contributing to the revival of an endemic American grape with extensive history called Norton.

When he’s not crushing grapes and tasting wine from barrels, Milan can be found watching the Baltimore Orioles and studying the ever-changing New England weather to learn how to make the best wines possible at Truro Vineyards.

david-roberts-juniorDavid Roberts Jr.

David Roberts Jr. grew up with his father in the wine and spirits industry, which led to his decision to pursue beer making as his field. After several years of homebrewing, he began professional brewing at Flying Monkey in Kansas. He then moved to Atlanta, GA where he was employed at Sweetwater Brewery as a brewer and bottler for over eight years. In 2007 Dave started making wine alongside Matyas Vogel and continually is perfecting his craft.

He enjoys the differences between winemaking and beer making, specifically the seasonality of wine. “The beer making process is much quicker and can occur at any time. Winemaking is a gradual build up to harvest and then its all about the creation and the aging. It’s an interesting difference and for me it keeps it exciting.”